Sunday, June 20, 2021

Russian Helicopters Gearing Up To Mass Produce KA-226T Helicopters For India

Russian Helicopters is gearing up to mass-produce Ka-226T helicopters for India. The Ulan-Ude aviation plant has already started setting up the Ka-226 line to work out the technology, skill up the workforce, and shrink the production cycle as well as prepare for the eventual manufacture in India.

Earlier, Russian Helicopters Director General Andrey Boginsky discussed the helicopter’s key attributes with Russian President Vladimir Putin and Indian PM Narendra Modi on the sidelines of Eastern Economic Forum.

The Mi-171A2 export agreement with India demonstrates our state-of-the-art choppers which are in high demand, globally. We can hand over the helicopter to New Delhi once the Mi-171A2 certificate is validated in India, Boginsky said.

According to Boginsky, Russian Helicopters also presents the Ka-226T helicopter with foldable rotors. This modification is meant for operation at sea and for boarding vessels,” Boginsky explained. “This option is a good basis for additional orders of this machine.”

On Wednesday, during the Eastern Economic Forum, Russian President Vladimir Putin and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi talked about the benefits of Ka-226T light utility helicopters that Russia plans to deliver to India under the intergovernmental agreement signed in 2015.

“I flew on this helicopter, I liked it, it’s really comfortable. It’s good because it has coaxial rotors, there is no back rotor, so it is good with lateral wind pressure in the mountains and over the sea,” Putin told his Indian colleague, adding that this technology helps helicopters to land on a marine vessel.

New Delhi is looking to acquires the Ka-226T in order to replace the out-of-date Chetak and Cheetah helicopters. As per the $1-billion deal, which is yet to be signed, India is to procure first 60 helicopters from Russia in fly-away condition, while the remaining 140 will be made in India by a joint venture formed by Russian Helicopters and HAL.

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