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What Made Oppressed Christians in Pakistan Vote For Imran Khan?

Imran Khan will soon take oath as the new Prime Minister of Pakistan and stakes are high. People of all communities have voted for him as they bought his endorsements of change. The cricketer turned politician is being termed as a candidate of the army by some while some call him the face of change. But in the Islamic Republic of Pakistan, why have the Christians in Pakistan voted for Imran Khan’s PTI? 

Imran Khan Tehreek-E-Insaf Pakistan (Movement for Justice) won 116 seats, ousting Nawaz Sharif’s Pakistan Muslim League by a huge margin. According to Pakistan Tribune, Nawaz Sharif may now cry foul sitting behind the prison bars but the truth is that Imran Khan’s rise to power was almost certain. Imran Khan will soon come to the helm of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan irrespective of being a dummy to the army or not.

Christians in Pakistan Support Imran Khan?

Christians in Pakistan have been brutalised for years and they have been at the receiving end of relentless atrocities inflicted by the perception of an Islamic nation. They have paid heavily for being a minority in a Muslim majority nation.

Parties in Pakistan made massive promises to them before each election but they were ignored conveniently thereafter. Christians in Pakstan also hold Nawaz Sharif’s Muslim League as being responsible for playing games with them. The Christian minority in Pakistan want to see new and intellectual people at the helm and perhaps Imran Khan suits this ambit the best.

Bringing educated and promising faces to the parliament is the last resort the minorities in Pakistan have. They have now lost hope in the old faces and the new faces which represent extremism and hatred.

How Pakistan ousted the likes of Hafiz Saeed and similar men and deprived them of any seats shows that Pakistan stands for peace. Pakistan has been rattled by several issues since time immemorial and a major chunk of these issues is shared by the minorities as well as the minorities. The former cricket captain is a metaphor of hope for them and perhaps their last one.

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